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Prove Your Metal: Top 10 Strongest Metals on Earth

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Top 10 Strongest Metals on Earth

Prove Your Metal: Top 10 Strongest Metals on Earth

The use of metals and the advancement of human civilization have gone hand in hand — and throughout the ages, each metal has proved its worth based on its properties and applications.

Today’s visualization from Viking Steel Structures outlines the 10 strongest metals on Earth and their applications.

What are Metals?

Metals are solid materials that are typically hard, shiny, malleable, and ductile, with good electrical and thermal conductivity. But not all metal is equal, which makes their uses as varied as their individual properties and benefits.

The periodic table below presents a simple view of the relationship between metals, nonmetals, and metalloids, which you can easily identify by color.

The Periodic Table

While 91 of the 118 elements of the periodic table are considered to be metals, only a few of them stand out as the strongest.

What Makes a Metal Strong?

The strength of a metal depends on four properties:

  1. Tensile Strength: How well a metal resists being pulled apart
  2. Compressive Strength: How well a material resists being squashed together
  3. Yield Strength: How well a rod or beam of a particular metal resists bending and permanent damage
  4. Impact Strength: The ability to resist shattering upon impact with another object or surface

Here are the top 10 metals based on these properties.

The Top 10 Strongest Metals

RankType of MetalExample UseAtomic WeightMelting Point
#1TungstenMaking bullets and missiles183.84 u3422°C / 6192 °F
#2 SteelConstruction of railroads, roads, other infrastructure and appliancesn/a1371°C / 2500°F
#3ChromiumManufacturing stainless steel51.96 u1907°C / 3465°F,
#4TitaniumIn the aerospace Industry, as a lightweight material with strength47.87 u1668°C / 3032°F
#5IronUsed to make bridges, electricity, pylons, bicycle chains, cutting tools and rifle barrels55.85 u1536°C / 2800°F
#6Vanadium80% of vanadium is alloyed with iron to make steel shock and corrosion resistance50.942 u1910°C / 3470°F
#7LutetiumUsed as catalysts in petroleum production.174.96 u1663 °C / 3025°F
#8ZirconiumUsed in nuclear power stations.91.22 u1850°C / 3.362°F
#9OsmiumAdded to platinum or indium to make them harder.190.2 u3000°C / 5,400°F
#10TantalumUsed as an alloy due to its high melting point and anti-corrosion.180.94 u3,017°C / 5462°F

Out of the Forge and into Tech: Metals for the Future

While these metals help to forge the modern world, there is a new class of metals that are set to create a new future.

Rare Earth elements (REEs) are a group of metals do not rely on their strength, but instead their importance in applications in new technologies, including those used for green energy.

MetalUses
NeodymiumMagnets containing neodymium are used in green technologies such as the manufacture of wind turbines and hybrid cars.
LanthanumUsed in catalytic converters in cars, enabling them to run at high temperatures
CeriumThis element is used in camera and telescope lenses.
PraseodymiumUsed to create strong metals for use in aircraft engines.
GadoliniumUsed in X-ray and MRI scanning systems, and also in television screens.
Yttrium, terbium, europiumMaking televisions and computer screens and other devices that have visual displays.

If the world is going to move towards a more sustainable and efficient future, metals—both tough and smart—are going to be critical. Each one will serve a particular purpose to build the infrastructure and technology for the next generation.

Our ability to deploy technology with the right materials will test the world’s mettle to meet the challenges of tomorrow—so choose wisely.

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How the Savings Account Became a Destroyer of Wealth

The interest income needed to beat inflation since 1994 has varied, but in the last 13 years, savings accounts failed to live up to the task.

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How the Savings Account Became a Destroyer of Wealth

Has saving money ever been less rewarding? The average U.S. personal savings account now returns about $100, or 0.1% per $100,000 in interest income on deposits. This is well below the $1,283 per $100,000 required to beat inflation.

In fact, savings accounts have been eroding household wealth for some 13 years. This data from JP Morgan reveals that the interest income needed to beat inflation has consistently fell short tracking back to 2008-2009.

This is a result of ultra low interest rates, as the amount needed to beat inflation has remained fairly steady. When interest rates took a nosedive during the Great Recession, so too did the earnings potential on savings accounts.

Withering Interest Income

Typically, banks and financial institutions pay interest on deposits to incentivize keeping your money with them. These deposits are funneled into their lending business, where they charge higher rates. The difference is called net interest margin, a common financial industry metric.

All things equal, rates go up when demand for loans exceeds the supply of loanable funds, and go down when the reverse holds true. But central bank money printing has altered this equation. With quite literally trillions injected via quantitative easing, the money supply, or supply of loanable funds, has skyrocketed well past any expected level of demand. As a result, rates today are near 700-year lows.

Can The Savings Account Be Saved?

If interest rates do pick back up, the returns on the typical savings account should follow.

Interestingly, one factor that could buoy returns on savings is inflation itself, which is starting to rise. Given one of the Fed’s mandates is to control inflation, any prolonged and serious uptick could mean opening the monetary policy tool box and influencing matters to offset this. This includes raising rates, possibly well above inflation.

An ultra low rate environment has become the status quo for over a decade now, though some market commentators say rates could have a reversion to the mean moment. But the macro environment is highly unpredictable, so how and when that happens is truly anybody’s guess.

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Visualizing the Power of Gold Versus Currencies

Over the last 40 years, the purchasing power of the world’s most popular currencies have declined against gold.

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Visualizing the Power of Gold Versus Currencies

The Power of Gold Versus Currencies

Since the gold standard was abandoned in 1971, the relationship in value between currencies and gold has moved in only one direction: down.

At that time, U.S. President Richard Nixon suspended the convertibility of the dollar into gold, effectively bringing the Bretton Woods system to an end.

Today’s visualization comes from the In Gold We Trust report, and it shows that over the last 40 years, the purchasing power of the world’s most popular currencies have declined significantly against the precious metal.

Turbulent Years

In the first decade after the gold standard was abandoned, the international monetary system was seriously shaken. Several U.S. recessions, coupled with international conflicts and high price inflation put the world’s reserve currency under enormous pressure.

During the 1973-74 oil crisis the price of gold rose 65%. In 1978, U.S. bonds had to be issued in the hard currencies of the Swiss franc and the German mark–the so-called Carter bonds.

The next decade saw the rehabilitation of the dollar through a highly restrictive monetary policy run by the Federal Reserve that led to sky-high interest rates. The trend continued with the fall of the communist Eastern Bloc in the early 1990s.

The Erosion of Purchasing Power is Accelerating

Gold is still the universal reserve asset to which central banks, investors, and private individuals return in times of crisis. Since 1971, the average annual growth rate of the metal price in U.S. dollars is just over 10%. Since the Euro was introduced in 1999, the gold price in EUR has risen by 356%, or on average 7.8% per year.

Unsurprisingly, over the last 40 years, the best performing G-10 currency was the Swiss franc, largely due to its close relationship with gold. The Swiss National Bank has one of the largest reserves worldwide.

CountryGold Reserve (Tonnes)
Value (US$ billions)
🇺🇸 United States8,133.46$493.6
🇩🇪 Germany3,362.45$204.1
🇮🇹 Italy2,451.84 $148.8
🇫🇷 France2,436.19$147.8
🇷🇺 Russia2,298.53$139.5
🇨🇳 China1,948.31$118.2
🇨🇭 Switzerland1,040.00$63.1
🇯🇵 Japan765.22$46.4
🇮🇳 India676.64$41.1
🇳🇱 Netherlands612.45$37.2

Despite significant corrections, gold was able to outperform virtually every other asset class and above all, every other currency between 2001 and 2019.

Gold breakout

Amid the turmoil brought about by Covid-19, investors again increased their exposure to gold. In August, the metal price surpassed $2,000 per ounce for the first time ever.

As political and economic tensions tend to endure over the next decades, so does gold’s role as an anchor during uncertain times.

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